John L. Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance

2001 Events

Thurs., Nov. 8, 2001
Corporate Governance Guidelines: Common Ground – Realistic Expectations?

  1. William Chandler, Chancellor, Court of Chancery
  2. Margaret Foran, Vice President for Corporate Governance, Pfizer
  3. Constance Horner, Brookings Institute and Director, Pfizer
  4. Ann Mule, General Attorney and Corporate Secretary, Sunoco
  5. Stephen Norman, Secretary, American Express Company
  6. Richard Steinberg, Partner, Leader, Corporate Governance, PricewaterhouseCoopers

 

Thurs., Nov 1, 2001
Audit Committee Reform and Financial Misconduct – Effective Medicine or Placebo?

  1. R. Franklin Balotti, Director, Richards, Finger & Layton
  2. David Becker, General Counsel, SEC
  3. Don Langevoort, Professor, Georgetown University Law Center
  4. Bethany McLean, Senior Writer, Fortune Magazine
  5. The Honorable John W. Noble, Vice Chancellor, Court of Chancery
  6. Mark Terrell, Partner-in-Charge, Audit Committee Institute, KPMG
  7. The Honorable Joseph T. Walsh, Justice, Delaware Supreme Court

 

Tues., Oct. 23, 2001
Corporate Democracy and the Shareholder Resolution – A failed “Hyde Park Corner” or
legitimate governance tool?

  1. Carol Bowie, Director, Corporate Governance Service, IRRC
  2. Harry Goldsmith, Sr. Vice President & General Counsel, AutoZone
  3. Alan Palmiter, Professor, Wake Forest Law School
  4. Linda Scott, Director of Investor Affairs, New York State Retirement Fund
  5. The Honorable Myon T. Steele, Justice, Delaware Supreme Court
  6. Beth Young, Representing Council Institutional Investors

 

Thurs. Oct 4, 2001
The Poison Pill – Shareholder Toxin or Value Creator

  1. David Berger, Wilson, Sonsini, Goodrich & Rosati
  2. Herbert Denton, Providence Capital, Inc.
  3. Blaine Fogg, Partner, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP
  4. Floyd Norris, Business Writer, New York Times
  5. The Honorable Leo E. Strine, Vice Chancellor, Court of Chancery
  6. The Honorable E. Norman Veasey, Chief Justice, Delaware Supreme Court
  7. John Wilcox, Vice Chairman, Georgeson

 

Thurs., Sept. 27, 2001
Executive Overcompensation – A problem or a solution?

  1. Frank Balotti, Director, Richards, Finger & Layton
  2. Hank Barnette, ‘Of Counsel,’ Skadden Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom and Chairman Emeritus, Bethlehem Steel
  3. Dan Butler, Chairman, CSC Corporation Service Company
  4. John Byrne, Senior Writer, Business Week
  5. Fred Cook, Frederic W. Cook & Company
  6. The Honorable Stephen P. Lamb, Vice Chancellor, Court of Chancery
  7. Meredith Miller, Asst Treasurer, State of Connecticut

 

Thurs., Sept. 4, 2001
Corporate Governance – Stakeholders V. Stockholders. Whose Corporation is it anyhow?

  1. The Honorable Jack B. Jacobs, Vice Chancellor, Court of Chancery
  2. Kim Johnson, General Counsel, Colorado Public Employees’ Retirement Association
  3. Peter Langerman, CEO, Franklin Mutual Advisors
  4. Frank Newman, Former CEO Eckerd
  5. Damon Silvers, Associate General Counsel, AFL-CIO

 

Thurs., Apr. 12, 2001
Corporate Governance Guidelines: Common Ground – Realistic Expectations?

  1. Carolyn Brancato, Research Director, The Conference Board
  2. Mark Goldfus, Senior Vice President/General Counsel Corporate Law, Merrill Lynch
  3. Phillip Lochner, former SEC Commissioner; former General Counsel and Chief Administrative Officer, Time Warner
  4. Nils H. Okeson, Partner, Alston & Bird , Technology Group
  5. David Smith, President, American Society of Corporate Secretaries, Inc.
  6. The Honorable Leo E. Strine, Vice Chancellor, Delaware Court of Chancery

 

Tues., Apr. 3, 2001
Audit Committee Reform and Financial Misconduct – Effective Medicine or Placebo?

  1. William Bishop, President, Institute of Internal Auditors
  2. Robin Blumenthal, Journalist, Barron’s
  3. The Honorable William B. Chandler, III, Chancellor, Delaware Court of Chancery
  4. Michael Cook, Former Chairman & CEO, Deloitte & Touche
  5. Catherine Dixon, Partner, Weil, Gotshal & Manges – Washington, D.C.; Former Chief Counsel, Division of Corporate Finance, SEC
  6. Amy Goodman, Of Counsel, Gibson Dunn & Crutcher – Washington, D.C.

 

Thurs., Mar. 15, 2001
Topic: Corporate Democracy and the Shareholder Resolution – A failed “Hyde Park Corner” or legitimate governance tool?

  1. Stuart Gillan, Research Economist, TIAA-CREF
  2. The Honorable Randy Holland, Justice, Delaware Supreme Court
  3. Louise Lancaster, Corporate Secretary, DuPont
  4. Ann Yerger, Director of Council Research, Council of Institutional Investors

 

Thurs. Mar. 8, 2001
Topic: The Poison Pill – Shareholder Toxin or Value Creator?

  1. William Crowley, President & COO, ESL Investments
  2. The Honorable Jack B. Jacobs, Vice Chancellor, Delaware Court of Chancery
  3. Jonathon Karpoff, University of Washington, currently a visiting scholar at Emory University
  4. The Honorable Stephen P. Lamb, Vice Chancellor, Delaware Court of Chancery
  5. Steve Lipin, Financial Editor, Wall Street Journal
  6. Raymond McGuire, Managing Director, Morgan Stanley Dean Witter
  7. Paul Rowe, Partner, Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen, & Katz

 

Thurs., Mar. 1, 2001
Topic: Executive Overcompensation – A problem or a solution?

  1. Alfred DeCrane, Former Chairman and CEO, Texaco Inc.
  2. Jay Eisenhofer, Partner, Grant & Eisenhofer, P.A.
  3. Pearl Meyer, President, Pearl Meyer & Partners
  4. Cynthia Richson, Investor Responsibility Program Officer, State of Wisconsin
  5. The Honorable E. Norman Veasey, Chief Justice, Delaware Supreme Court

 

Thurs., Feb. 22, 2001
Corporate Philanthropy: Societal Boom or Shareholder Bust?

  1. Jill Fisch, Professor, Fordham Law School
  2. Jonathan Gottlieb, Division of Corporate Finance, SEC
  3. James Hale, Executive Vice President, General Counsel & Corporate Secretary, Target Corp
  4. The Honorable Jack B. Jacobs, Vice Chancellor, Delaware Court of Chancery
  5. A. Gilchrist Sparks, III, Senior Partner, Morris, Nichols, Arsht & Tunnell- Wilmington, DE
  6. The Honorable Joseph T. Walsh, Justice, Supreme Court of Delaware

 

Thurs., Feb. 15, 2001
Topic: Corporate Governance – Stakeholders V. Stockholders: Whose Corporation is it anyhow?

  1. Kenneth Bertsch, Director, Corporate Governance, TIAA-CREF
  2. James J. Hanks, Jr., Senior Partner, Ballard, Spahr, Andrews & Ingersoll – Baltimore, MD
  3. The Honorable Stephen P. Lamb, Vice Chancellor, Delaware Court of Chancery
  4. Damon Silvers, Associate General Counsel, AFL-CIO
  5. The Honorable Myron T. Steele, Justice, Supreme Court of Delaware

The Lerner College is home to a state-of-the-art financial trading facility, the $1.5 million student-led Blue Hen Investment Club, a student-managed restaurant and hotel, a high-technology development center of a global bank and a start-up experience for students with new business ideas.

Lerner College faculty - like Meryl Gardner, whose research on foods and moods was recently published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology - are thought leaders who command attention from influential business audiences, economists and policy makers.

All Lerner College departments offer discovery learning experiences and emphasize data-based analytics to enrich the student experience. Here, students at Vita Nova, our award-winning restaurant run through HRIM, joined professional chefs and winemakers in hosting a 2014 Mid-Atlantic Wine and Food Festival event.

The Institute for Financial Services Analytics is a collaboration between the Lerner College, UD's College of Engineering and JPMorgan Chase, and hosts events for academics and the business community designed to address consumer analytics and industry applications.

Undergraduate scholarships, made possible through the generosity of alumni and friends, enable us to support promising scholars. Here, Delaware Gov. Jack Markell and his mother, Leni Markell, join recipients of the William Markell Scholarship (center), which benefits students in Accounting and MIS.

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